Italian court considers pivotal electoral law

Italian court considers pivotal electoral law

Italy’s Constitutional Court will debate the legality of a 2015 electoral law known as Italicum on Tuesday. The law, which

Photo: Reuters

Photo: Reuters

Italy’s Constitutional Court will debate the legality of a 2015 electoral law known as Italicum on Tuesday.

The law, which was introduced in a bid to end the country’s revolving-door of governments, dictates that a party with 40% of the popular vote will be allocated 54% of lower house seats. Many in Italy – and indeed across Europe – are concerned that this makes it easier for the poll-leading populist and Eurosceptic Five Star Movement to seize power.

If the Court rules aspects of the law unconstitutional, the ruling centre-left Democratic Party will be able to scrap Italicum and possibly prevent their populist rivals from forming government. A successful reform of the electoral laws also means early elections are likely to be called ahead of the May 2018 deadline.

While the Constitutional Court may not reach a definitive ruling on Italicum on Tuesday, Italy’s parliament will continue to prioritise electoral reform to prepare for the next elections.