NATO defence ministers discuss counterterrorism in Brussels

NATO defence ministers discuss counterterrorism in Brussels

NATO defence ministers gather today in Brussels to follow through on their leader’s commitments made during last month’s summit. Given

Photo: AP/ Mindaugas Kulbis

Photo: AP/ Mindaugas Kulbis

NATO defence ministers gather today in Brussels to follow through on their leader’s commitments made during last month’s summit. Given terrorist attacks this month in the UK and France, counterterror strategies are likely to top the agenda.

Shortly after the Manchester attack in May, NATO formally joined the coalition against ISIS. While this was primarily a political proclamation, the move was was significant. France and Germany, once opposed to NATO’s joining, swung their support towards the move in a move seen as appeasing Washington/

According to Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg, NATO will primarily provide surveillance and training, not direct military assistance, The alliance will will establish a terrorism intelligence unit—a development that will complement Britain’s newly proposed path to monitoring online extremism.

NATO is to coordinate among its member nations to ensure equal contribution. Defence ministers gathered today must now discuss how to strike a balance between NATO protocol and their individual agendas.