Acrimony in the streets of Bolivia as courts clear path for President Morales fourth term

Acrimony in the streets of Bolivia as courts clear path for President Morales fourth term

Protesters in La Paz will take to the streets today in opposition to President Evo Morales’ bid to seek a fourth term in 2019. A socialist, Morales nationalized the country’s oil and gas industries soon after his election in 2006, which led to an influx of wealth to the state. Spending this money on successful social welfare

Bolivia Protest

Photo: Juan Karita/AP

Protesters in La Paz will take to the streets today in opposition to President Evo Morales’ bid to seek a fourth term in 2019.

A socialist, Morales nationalized the country’s oil and gas industries soon after his election in 2006, which led to an influx of wealth to the state. Spending this money on successful social welfare programs, the first indigenous president was popular for much of his 13-year rule.

However, it now seems like the people’s love of Morales is nearing an end. 51% of Bolivians rejected his proposal to abolish presidential term limits last year, and nearly 70% of citizens do not want him in office a fourth time. Despite this, Bolivia’s top court last week found Morales to be constitutionally eligible for re-election on the basis that term limits violate human rights.

Although there’s no scope to appeal the court’s ruling, protestors are likely to continue demonstrations. Without access to legal channels, expect people to stop him at the voting booth in 2019.

Delve deeper: Bolivia’s president: the last leftist standing?

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